Some really motivational quotes to help you through a weak moment!

 
Film lovers will remember May 7, 2013 as the end of era.
For that is the day legendary stop motion animator, Ray Harryhausen, passed away at 92 years young. Ray was beloved to anyone who appreciated the boundless capabilities of the human imagination. During his 70 years as an animator, visual effects artist and motion picture producer, Harryhausen created some of the best loved fantasy films and science fiction films of all time.
Harryhausen was the last of his generation. A visual artist who brought monsters and fantastic creatures to life from clay and hard work, rather than with pixels and a modern computer. He was the genius behind many of Hollywood’s greatest  movies, including Mighty Joe Young, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, It Came from Beneath the Sea, Earth vs. the Flying Saucers, 20 Million Miles to Earth, The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, The Three Worlds of Gulliver, Mysterious Island, Jason and the Argonauts, First Men in the Moon, One Million Years B.C., The Valley of Gwangi, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger and Clash of the Titans.
Anyone who loves movies and was born prior to 1970 will fondly recall growing up on a steady diet of Ray’s wonderful work. We thrilled to Sinbad’s battles with the Cyclops and the giant Roc. We were amazed when Jason and his companions fought a small army of skeletons and we smiled in sympathy with the poor Yimr from Venus, out of place on earth, and doomed to a tragic end.
Even the modern generation is familiar with Haryhausen’s final big screen effort, Clash of The Titans, with Pegasus, Bubo the Owl, the Kraken, and Medusa, all brought patiently to life by Mr. Harryhausen’s skilled hands. It is a sad commentary on modern sensibilities, that despite the classic status of the film, Hollywood decided to remake the picture in 2009, with CGI replacing Ray’s wonderful animation.
To understand the impact Harryhausen had on the film industry, we need look no further than one admirer, George Lucas of Star Wars fame, who said, Without Ray Harryhausen, there would likely have been no STAR WARS.î
James Cameron, director of the two highest earning films in the history of the cinema, Titanic and Avatar, spoke with admiration about Ray Harryhausen: “I think all of us who are practioners in the arts of science fiction and fantasy movies now all feel that weíre standing on the shoulders of a giant. If not for Rayís contribution to the collective dreamscape, we wouldnít be who we are.”
Perhaps the greatest tribute to Harryhuasen came from another Ray, author, and legend in his own right, Ray Bradbury. The two Rays were lifelong best friends and they shared many of the same passions for film, literature, fantasy and science fiction. Bradbury, who passed away in 2012, spoke about his friend, saying, “Harryhausen stands alone as a technician, as an artist and as a dreamer. … He breathed life into mythological creatures he constructed with his own hands.”
We can only hope the two best buddies, Ray Harryhausen and Ray Bradbury, are in a better place now, trading tales and creating creatures of wonder from the stuff of heaven.

 

Film lovers will remember May 7, 2013 as the end of era.

For that is the day legendary stop motion animator, Ray Harryhausen, passed away at 92 years young. Ray was beloved to anyone who appreciated the boundless capabilities of the human imagination. During his 70 years as an animator, visual effects artist and motion picture producer, Harryhausen created some of the best loved fantasy films and science fiction films of all time.

Harryhausen was the last of his generation. A visual artist who brought monsters and fantastic creatures to life from clay and hard work, rather than with pixels and a modern computer. He was the genius behind many of Hollywood’s greatest  movies, including Mighty Joe Young, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, It Came from Beneath the Sea, Earth vs. the Flying Saucers, 20 Million Miles to Earth, The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, The Three Worlds of Gulliver, Mysterious Island, Jason and the Argonauts, First Men in the Moon, One Million Years B.C., The Valley of Gwangi, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger and Clash of the Titans.

Anyone who loves movies and was born prior to 1970 will fondly recall growing up on a steady diet of Ray’s wonderful work. We thrilled to Sinbad’s battles with the Cyclops and the giant Roc. We were amazed when Jason and his companions fought a small army of skeletons and we smiled in sympathy with the poor Yimr from Venus, out of place on earth, and doomed to a tragic end.

Even the modern generation is familiar with Haryhausen’s final big screen effort, Clash of The Titans, with Pegasus, Bubo the Owl, the Kraken, and Medusa, all brought patiently to life by Mr. Harryhausen’s skilled hands. It is a sad commentary on modern sensibilities, that despite the classic status of the film, Hollywood decided to remake the picture in 2009, with CGI replacing Ray’s wonderful animation.

To understand the impact Harryhausen had on the film industry, we need look no further than one admirer, George Lucas of Star Wars fame, who said, Without Ray Harryhausen, there would likely have been no STAR WARS.î

James Cameron, director of the two highest earning films in the history of the cinema, Titanic and Avatar, spoke with admiration about Ray Harryhausen: “I think all of us who are practioners in the arts of science fiction and fantasy movies now all feel that weíre standing on the shoulders of a giant. If not for Rayís contribution to the collective dreamscape, we wouldnít be who we are.”

Perhaps the greatest tribute to Harryhuasen came from another Ray, author, and legend in his own right, Ray Bradbury. The two Rays were lifelong best friends and they shared many of the same passions for film, literature, fantasy and science fiction. Bradbury, who passed away in 2012, spoke about his friend, saying, “Harryhausen stands alone as a technician, as an artist and as a dreamer. … He breathed life into mythological creatures he constructed with his own hands.”

We can only hope the two best buddies, Ray Harryhausen and Ray Bradbury, are in a better place now, trading tales and creating creatures of wonder from the stuff of heaven.

16 notes

6inchheelsaretooshort:

Marlon Brando preparing for Guys and Dolls (1955).

now thats gotta be a rare shot!!

6inchheelsaretooshort:

Marlon Brando preparing for Guys and Dolls (1955).

now thats gotta be a rare shot!!

5 notes